• Hurricane Dorian and the Hunting Scene Persian Rug

    My German-speaking maternal grandfather, Joszef Guth, immigrated to the United States from Hungary in 1912. He was 21 years old and had trained as a
    (0)
  • Mr. Stacy’s Cool House

    Long before the electrification of villages on the Outer Banks, islanders built small screened “houses” that they mounted on posts in their yards. Called cool
    (0)
  • Capt. Myron A. Garrish

    As early as 1785 records indicate that Ocracoke residents were concerned with education. On August 20 of that year the estate of Jobe Wahab made
    (0)
  • The Ocracoke School Song

    A few days ago, Sundae Horn, our local community librarian, sent me a copy of the sheet music for “The Ocracoke School Song.” Arnold Sundgaard
    (0)
  • The 1837 Wreck of the Steamboat Home

    The following account is taken from the book, Digging up Uncle Evans, by Philip Howard. In October of 1837 the Steamboat Home wrecked on Ocracoke
    (0)
  • The Fresnel Lens

    Essay by Lachlan Howard Since its invention in 1822 by the French physicist Augustin Fresnel, the Fresnel lens has been changing the world around us.
    (0)
  • Why I Stayed

    By Philip Howard September, 2018 Hurricane Florence, a Category 4 storm packing 140 mph winds, was churning away in the Atlantic. The forecast indicated she
    (0)
  • Mrs. Godfrey’s Ghost

    This story is an edited version that was originally published in the book, Digging up Uncle Evans, by Philip Howard, © 2008. I didn’t recognize
    (0)
  • Ocracoke Street Names

    Ocracoke streets did not have official names until 1999. Street signs appeared in 2005. Prior to that time the names of Ocracoke’s streets were fluid,
    (0)
  • My First Island Patient, by Dr. Warren Silverman

    In the summer of 1981 Warren Silverman, M.D. moved to Ocracoke. It had been four decades since Ocracoke had a resident doctor. Dr. Silverman’s wife,
    (0)
  • Ocracoke Lighthouse

    Ocracoke’s 75’ tall white tower with a steady beam is the island’s most recognizable landmark. Built in 1823 by Noah Porter of Massachusetts for $11,359.35
    (0)
  • The Island Inn and Lodge No. 194, Independent Order of Odd Fellows

    The story of Ocracoke’s Island Inn begins with the construction of a meeting house for Lodge No. 194, Independent Order of Odd Fellows, in 1901.
    (0)
  • A History of Village Craftsmen on Ocracoke Island

    Village Craftsmen…49 years offering fine quality American handcrafts on Ocracoke Island. Lawton Howard was born on Ocracoke Island October 10, 1911. When he was a
    (0)
  • Quaintest Town in America on a N.C. Island

    The following article is from The Deming Headlight (Deming, New Mexico) ·  Fri, Oct 5, 1923.  No author is cited. Although there are a few
    (0)
  • Old Christmas in Rodanthe

    In 46 BC, Julius Caesar decreed that the Roman world should adopt his new calendar. Based on the solar year, rather than lunar cycles, it
    (0)
  • A Description of Occacock, 1795

    In New Bern, North Carolina, in 1795, Francois-X Martin published an eight-page pamphlet by Jonathan Price titled A DESCRIPTION OF OCCACOCK INLET*. Jonathan Price, a
    (0)
  • The Hurricane of 1944

    Following is a transcript of a personal letter re. the 1944 hurricane on Ocracoke Island. It was written by the wife of one of the
    (0)
  • Island Stairsteps

    Instead of using the common terms “staircase” or simply “stairs,” older Ocracoke islanders are more likely to say “stairsteps.” I live in a typical small
    (0)
  • Howard’s Pub of Ocracoke Island

    In 1978 Ron Howard, direct descendant of an early colonial owner of Ocracoke Island, decided to build a pub on his property at the edge
    (0)
  • The 1899 Wreck of the Ariosto

    The following account comes from the Sacramento Daily Union, Volume 98, Number 126, December 25, 1899 (illustrations added): TWENTY-ONE OF THE CREW DROWNED British Steamship Ariosto
    (0)
  • Rex O’Neal Gigging Flounders

    This link will take you to a Coastal Voices audio of Rex O’Neal telling about the night that he fell overboard while gigging flounders off
    (0)
  • The Story of the Mailboat Aleta

    Follow this link to find out all about the Mailboat Aleta that began running trips between Atlantic and Ocracoke in 1938.
    (0)
  • Ocracoke’s Condomed Nautilus

    The World Submarine Invitational 1996, a human-powered submarine race pitting design teams from around the world, was held in San Diego, California, 3-12 April 1996.
    (0)
  • The Ocracoke Water Tank Caper

    The Ocracoke Water Tank Caper….or…That’s No Swimmin’ Hole – A Dingbatter’s Tale By Michael Mincher When I was in college I was fortunate enough to
    (0)
  • The Electrification of Ocracoke Island, 1936-2017

    On March 15, 2016, Heidi Smith, Manager of Economic Development for Tideland Electric Membership Corporation, presented a history of the electrification of Ocracoke Island to
    (0)
  • The Great Lighthouse Window Heist A First-Person Account

    by Ellen Fulcher Cloud, from her book, Ocracoke Lighthouse, 1993, Chapter 6. The Ocracoke Lighthouse and the structures within the compound were on the National
    (0)
  • The Rumgagger

    For several decades Capt. Rob Temple of the Schooner Windfall II and the Skipjack Wilma Lee has been composing piratical poetry and nautical nonsense which
    (0)
  • Cap’n Gary Bragg Still Makes Wooden Geese

    By Aycock Brown (Originally published November 13, 1938) Migratory wildfowl, ducks, geese and brant will be more plentiful along the coast of North Carolina this
    (0)
  • Earthquakes

    Sometime in the late 1970s (I didn’t record the date) I was standing in my parents’ living room on the corner of Lawton Lane and
    (0)
  • My Ocracoke: Life Amidst 250 Years of Family History

    (The following article is reprinted from the Outer Banks Magazine, Volume 4, 2016.) Story by Philip Howard Photographs by Daniel Pullen At one time nearly
    (0)
  • Ocracoke . . .The French Connection

    Most people familiar with Ocracoke are aware that European settlers in the early colonial period came mostly from the British Isles (England, Ireland, Scotland, and
    (0)
  • July 4th Parade, 1953

    Following is an article written by Alice K. Rondthaler about one of Ocracoke’s first July 4th parades. It was published July 6, 1953. (Accompanying photos are
    (0)
  • A History of the Life-Saving Service

    from Pearson’s Magazine, 1903 by Theodore Waters “It will be the worst hurricane that swept the Cape,” said Captain Pugh of the Gull Shoal Life-Saving
    (0)
  • Sambo, The Life-Saving Horse

    “Sambo, the Life-Saving Horse” was written in January, 1968, by Allie (Teenie) Scott. This sweet story was never finished, but it provides a glimpse into the
    (0)
  • Between the Sound and the Sea

    March 21, 2016 Between the Sound and the Sea From 1973 to 1976 native North Carolinian Karen G. Helms (1947-2003), while earning a Master of
    (0)
  • Beatrice Wells, Child Evangelist on Ocracoke

    In the mid-1930s Pentecostal/Holiness evangelists began holding “preaching services” at the Ocracoke schoolhouse. In July, 1938, Miss Alice Austin, from Hatteras Island, and several others,
    (0)
  • Lost at Sea

    Following is a partial list of Ocracoke Island natives, residents, descendants & others associated with Ocracoke who were lost at sea or drowned (from ca.
    (0)
  • The Schooner Paragon

    Job Wahab (nearly everyone called him Jobie) had the sea in his blood. Born on Ocracoke Island in 1802, he was, according to one legend,
    (0)
  • Bett’s Dream and the Wreck of the Banana Boat

    Elizabeth (“Bett”) Linton (1856-1910) was born in Wysocking, Hyde County, North Carolina. She married Ocracoke native and widower, Amon Howard (ca. 1820-ca. 1885). Two years after
    (0)
  • The Great Ocracoke Cat Hunt

    This small book was written and published by former Ocracoke School teacher Mary E. Williams in 1961. It provides a glimpse into island life more
    (0)
  • Whale and Porpoise Fishing on the Outer Banks

    In the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries, whales and “porpoises” (actually bottle-nose dolphins)* were hunted commercially by Outer Banks fishermen. Evidence of this industry on Ocracoke
    (0)
  • The Stovepipe Hat Wreck

    My father occasionally told me the story of the mid-nineteenth century Outer Banks “stovepipe hat” shipwreck. It allegedly happened at Rodanthe before my father’s time,
    (0)
  • Rum Running on the Outer Banks

    The Eighteenth Amendment to the United States Constitution was ratified on January 16, 1920. The amendment reads, in part, “After one year from the ratification
    (0)
  • First Time Visit to Portsmouth Island, Part II

    Story & Photos by Crystal Canterbury (Click here for Part I) In 1894 a United States Life Saving Station (U.S.L.S.S.) was established on Portsmouth and
    (0)
  • First Time Visit to Portsmouth Island, Part I

    Story & Photos by Crystal Canterbury Over the past four years that I’ve lived on Ocracoke, events – some planned, some not – motivated me
    (0)
  • The Ocracoke Orgy

    Not long ago I was asked to write a short article about the “Ocracoke Orgy!” Those two words conjure up widely divergent images: a quaint
    (0)
  • The Wahabs of Ocracoke Island

    Do a Google search for “Wahab,” and the Internet’s most comprehensive search engine returns more than thirteen million results. A cursory glance at the list
    (0)
  • The 1890 Ocracoke Oyster War

    The Eastern oyster (Crassostrea virginca), a tasty bivalve mollusk, has been harvested in North American waters since prehistoric times. Native American shell piles in coastal
    (0)
  • Murder on Ocracoke!

    Jacob Gaskill was two years old in 1787 when his father, Benjamine, died. He was sixteen when his mother, Jane Williams Gaskill, died. At age
    (0)
  • Hunting Ducks & Geese in 1910

    The following reprint is an excerpt from the article, “Winter Sport in Virginia and North Carolina,” in the Book of the Royal Blue, a magazine published
    (0)
  • Hatteras, Seat of NC State Government During the Civil War

    Hatteras, a lonely outpost on the Outer Banks of North Carolina, was the seat of state government in 1861…or so thought Rev. Marble Nash Taylor
    (0)
  • Steamships & Ocracoke

    Ocracoke has been a tourist destination for much longer than most people realize. In 1795 Jonathan Price produced a map, “taken by actual survey” of
    (0)
  • Ocracoke Crab Festival

    From 1984 to 1989 the Ocracoke Civic Club Business Committee hosted an annual Ocracoke Crab Festival in early May. The Festival was a popular event
    (0)
  • Agnes Scott of Ocracoke

    Agnes Irvine Scott (1799-1877), Namesake of Agnes Scott College, Decatur, Georgia, and her Ocracoke Island Descendants Agnes Scott Garrish was just 21 years old when
    (0)
  • Charles (Vera) Williams

    No one alive knows the full story of native Ocracoke islander, Charles Irvin Williams, born 1898, the son of Tilmon L. Williams and Elizabeth Scarborough
    (0)
  • From Philadelphia to Ocracoke, 1951

    I first came to Ocracoke Island in 1945. I was almost one year old. My father was born on the island in 1911. When he
    (0)
  • Boat Hauled Mail, More

    (reprint from a February 1, 1948 article in the Raleigh News & Observer, by Charles S. Killebrew) Every morning of the year about 10 o’clock
    (0)
  • The Telephone Comes to Ocracoke (1956)

    The first residential telephone service on Ocracoke Island was established by Carolina Telephone & Telegraph Company in 1956. The charge was $5.00/month. Nearly everyone in
    (0)
  • A Boat Ride and A Great Blue…Or, taking part in the annual Christmas Bird Count on Portsmouth Island.

    By Lou Ann Homan With apples in my backpack and my camera case slung over my shoulder I step down into the boat on this
    (0)
  • A Letter to Ocracoke, 1921

    In our September, 2011 Ocracoke Newsletter, Slavery on Ocracoke (http://www.villagecraftsmen.com/news092111.htm), I observed that “[s]laves on the Outer Banks, especially pilots and lighterers, were often in
    (0)
  • The Soundfront Inn

    Captain Elisha Chase, born March 13, 1790 in Swansea, Massachusetts, was descended from a long line of New England sea captains and businessmen. Elisha’s great-great-great
    (0)
  • Ocracoke Humor

    Ocracoke humor runs deep in islanders’ veins. Whether on the deck of a sailing vessel, on the porch of the general store, at the Coffee
    (0)
  • Hatteras Inlet Ferries

    As many of our readers know, Ocracoke citizens have been sparring with the North Carolina legislature for more than two years regarding ferry tolls. Some
    (0)
  • Infant & Childhood Mortality on Ocracoke

    Carl Goerch, in his 1956 book, Ocracoke, has a chapter titled “Died Before He Was Born.” In his book Goerch relates the story of visiting the
    (0)
  • July 4th Parade Photos

    In 1953 Capt. Marvin Howard made a proposal at the Ocracoke Civic Club’s Spring Meeting. “Let’s have some fun,” he announced, and suggested adding a
    (0)
  • Marvin Howard, A Life Well Lived

    Captain Marvin Wyche Howard (Sept. 11, 1897 – March 26, 1969) was just a week and a half old when a tropical storm battered Ocracoke
    (0)
  • A History of the United States Post Office at Ocracoke

    Early History of Mail Delivery in the North American Colonies During the seventeenth century, colonists in North America mostly relied on private connections (ship captains,
    (0)
  • The Wreck of the Black Squall

    This month’s Newsletter is the story of the Wreck of the Black Squall. This two-masted sailing vessel was carrying an exotic cargo when it struck
    (0)
  • The Ocracoke Island Greeting

    “Now Abraham was old, well advanced in years; and the Lord had blessed Abraham in all things. And Abraham said to his servant, the oldest
    (0)
  • Windmills on Ocracoke

    The prospect of cheap, reliable, environmentally friendly power has intrigued North Carolinians for many years. Since 2007, Duke Energy in cooperation with the University of
    (0)
  • The Day Lindbergh Landed on Ocracoke

    [The following article is from a collection of newspaper clippings saved by an island resident. I had heard this story many times. My father, cousin
    (0)
  • Ocracoke and the War of 1812

    The U.S. Coast Guard has recently expressed an interest in having the NC Department of Cultural Resources place a highway marker on Ocracoke in honor
    (0)
  • Fences of Howard Street & Lawton Lane

    For this month’s Newsletter we are going to take a stroll down Lawton Lane and Howard Street and look at the many fences around houses, yards,
    (0)
  • Midwifery in North Carolina and on Ocracoke Island

    History of Midwifery in North Carolina No doubt midwifery was practiced in North Carolina from the time of the earliest European settlers. However, it was
    (0)
  • Hurricane Boards

    The “Hurricane House” sits at the end of a sandy lane, overlooking Pamlico Sound. Built about 1900, it is a traditional “story and a jump”
    (0)
  • Molly Lovejoy’s 2012 Valedictory Address

    Ocracoke Graduating Class of 2012: (Echo Bennink, William O’Neal, Molly Lovejoy, Cassandra Hagins, Virginia Downes, Ashley Salinas-Lopez, & Leslie Espinoza) Molly Lovejoy: Following is Molly’s
    (0)
  • Island Recipes

    Every now and then I publish an island recipe on our Ocracoke Journal. In this month’s Ocracoke Newsletter I share a few more recipes taken
    (0)
  • Project Nutmeg

    Imagine Ocracoke with no paved roads, no ferry service, no visitors…and no residents. Imagine the landscape defaced with huge craters, homes and other buildings destroyed,
    (0)
  • The Rondthalers of Ocracoke

    Alice and Theodore Rondthaler had been married for a decade when Alice’s mother came from Connecticut to live with them in Clemmons, North Carolina. Mrs.
    (0)
  • The Civil War, Ocracoke, & Josephus Daniels

    On May 20, 1861 North Carolina seceded from the Union. Recognizing the importance of the Outer Banks, especially Hatteras Inlet, the most navigable inlet along
    (0)
  • Joe Bell

    While driving, biking, or walking almost anywhere along the Outer Banks from early April through December you are likely to notice clusters of brightly colored
    (0)
  • Ocracoke and the “Lost” Colony

    Although Ocracoke did not play a major role in the first attempts by the English to colonize America, Ocracoke is part of the story from
    (0)
  • There’s Nothing Like the Glory of November on the “Banks”

    By Capt. Marvin W. Howard, Ocracoke, N.C., originally published in the Coastland Times, November 12, 1954, re-published with minor editing (click on the links at
    (0)
  • Slavery on Ocracoke

    “Papa was always proud that none of his forebears owned slaves,” cousin Blanche Howard told me. “Only after he died did we discover that Daniel
    (0)
  • North Carolina’s First Hospital

    Although hospitals were well known in ancient Greece and Renaissance Europe, they were a relatively late development in the burgeoning British Colonies. The first was
    (0)
  • Late Night Can Be Bathed in a Beautiful Light

    by Lou Ann Homan-Saylor My summer life on Ocracoke is enchanting. Now that I have settled in, it feels as if this is my home,
    (0)
  • Ode to Mrs. Godfrey

    by Thomas E. MacDonald I was finally embarking on my much-anticipated vacation to my favorite destination and knew what to expect, or so I thought.
    (0)
  • History of the Life of Frank Treat Fulcher [An Autobiography, 1965]

    Born January 25, 1878, now 87 years old, who is the director of writing the Life of Old People of ocracoke Island and the Outer
    (0)
  • A History of Ocracoke Preservation Society

    For nearly 30 years Ocracoke Preservation Society has been working to preserve island culture, documents, artifacts, stories, and historic properties. The economic recession of the
    (0)
  • Traditional Ocracoke Home Remedies

    (Collected by the Ocracoke High School Yearbook staff, 1972-1973, with minor editing) General Diseases Drink sulfur and molasses to keep disease away Use collard leaves
    (0)
  • 1911 Wedding on Portsmouth Island

    Following is an account of a wedding that took place on Portsmouth Island nearly one hundred years ago. It is entitled “A Beautiful Church Wedding
    (0)
  • Sam Jones, Island Legend

    A small cemetery, enclosed by an unpainted, cedar picket fence, lies in the middle of the Springer’s Point Nature Preserve on Ocracoke Island. Ikey D
    (0)
  • Doxsee clam Factory, Ocracoke island, NC

    James Harvey Doxsee (1825-1907), sixth great grandson of Englishman James (“the Vicar”) Doxie, grew up on a four hundred acre farm in Islip, New York.
    (0)
  • Ocracoke Cisterns

    Prior to June of 1977 everyone living on Ocracoke Island relied on rainstorms and runoff from the roof for fresh drinking water. According to oral
    (0)
  • The Life of Ocracoke Native, Major General Ira Thomas Wyche (1887-1981)

    Upon a small sand hill, “Cedar Hammock” by name, on the north end of Ocracoke Island, the U.S. Life Saving Service established a new station
    (0)
  • Looking for the Wahabs

    by Dr. James J. Zogby ©  President, Arab American Institute  OCRACOKE ISLAND, N.C. We are just ending a family vacation on this little island off
    (0)
  • The Wreck of the George W. Wells, September 3, 1913

    She was a beautiful sight. At 325 feet long (302 feet at the keel), 48 feet at the beam, and weighing 2,970 tons, the six-masted
    (0)
  • Remembering Island Character Don Wood

    Text & Photos by Guest Columnist Robert (Jake) Thornbury It was a dark, moist, windy morning as the four of us boarded the 38′ Polynesian
    (0)
  • Guest Column: Schooner Windfall Sails into the Final Sunset

    By Rob Temple, April, 2010 Leave her, Johnny, leave her Oh leave her, Johnny, leave her! The voyage is done and the winds don’t blow
    (0)
  • Don Wood Thanksgiving Stories

    Over the years Ocracoke has been home to many a colorful character. Don Wood (1936-1998) was one of the more interesting. Don sold a marina
    (0)
  • Ocracats

    Pat Garber has asked me to publish the following article about the abundance of feral cats on Ocracoke Island. A PLEA FOR HELP: OCRACOKE’S CAT
    (0)
  • Early 20th Century Itinerants on Ocracoke

    Most of them were just trying to pay their bills. Some were scam artists. Others were attempting to save souls. In the early twentieth century
    (0)
  • Kelly O’Neal and the Revolution in Siam

    Several months ago native islander, Leroy O’Neal, sent me a copy of an old article by Don Dwiggins about his Uncle Kelly O”Neal (1911-1987) and
    (0)
  • Place Names on Ocracoke Island

    In the 1970s Ronnie Midgett and his wife Diane moved to Ocracoke. Ronnie had been called as pastor of the Assembly of God church. Although
    (0)
  • A Letter Concerning a Visit to Ocracoke

    By C.A. Weslager* [From the NC Historical Review, July 1958: The letter below was written following a trip to Ocracoke Island in 1949. When it
    (0)
  • Wind and History in the Rigging

    by Philip Howard (This was originally published in The Washington Post, Thursday, April 29, 1976) OCRACOKE, N.C. The old fisherman drew alongside in his crabopt-laden
    (0)
  • Blanche Jolliff Howard’s Ocracoke Photo Album

    Several months ago I was visiting cousin Blanche and she brought out an old photo album for me to look at. I made copies of
    (0)
  • Turtle Patrol, 2009

    by Lou Ann Homan The mosquitoes are thick as I wait this early morning for Corinna to pick me up for my weekly turtle patrol
    (0)
  • Remembering Growing up on Ocracoke, Part II

    Last month I published the first half of a short journal my father, Lawton W. Howard (1911-2002), wrote shortly before his death. This month I
    (0)
  • Remembering Growing up on Ocracoke, Part I

    Many of our readers will remember my father, Lawton Wesley Howard, Sr. (1911-2002). He was quite the character, and I have written about him in
    (0)
  • Paved Roads on Ocracoke

    In 1942 the Navy paved the first road on Ocracoke Island. Islanders called it the Ammunition Dump Road. From the Navy base (which included the
    (0)
  • Ocracoke Cemeteries and Epitaphs

    As many of our readers know, it is impossible to stroll through Ocracoke village for very long without encountering a cemetery. More than eighty family
    (0)
  • Christmas Bird Count on Portsmouth Island, 2008

    Text and Photos by Lou Ann Homan It is dark and chilly in the cottage when the alarm clock goes off. It is still vacation
    (0)
  • Live Oaks of Ocracoke, Part II

    Last month we published an article about the majestic live oaks on Ocracoke Island. You can read that Newsletter here. Because several readers have asked
    (0)
  • Ocracoke’s Artists’ colony

    “Is there an artists’ colony on Ocracoke?” is a question I frequently hear. “We do have a number of talented artists and musicians,” I reply, “but,
    (0)
  • The Ocracoke Assembly of God Church

    Ocracoke’s first house of worship was the Methodist Church, established on the island in 1828.  The congregation met in several different buildings over the years. 
    (0)
  • The Wreck of the Victoria S & Ocracoke’s First Automobile Accident

    “Son, why don’t you come along with me,” Homer called out. Lawton was eager to join his father on beach patrol. It was exciting to
    (0)
  • One Reason to NOT Move to Ocracoke

    For years newspaper reporters, authors of magazine articles, and long-time visitors to Ocracoke have extolled the virtues of island life. People routinely mention our extensive,
    (0)
  • A New Pitcher Pump

    by Lou Ann Homan The morning started out as every other morning. Fresh home-made bread toasted and spread with peach jam, hot coffee with cream,
    (0)
  • Lifesaving on Ocracoke Island

    It was 7:00 a.m., February 17, 1885, and the A.F. Crockett, a coastal schooner, was hard ashore about ten miles southwest of the Cedar Hammock
    (0)
  • Portsmouth Island Homecoming, 2008

    Honoring the Life Savers On Saturday, April 19, more than 400 people gathered on Portsmouth Island, just across the inlet from Ocracoke. The occasion was the
    (0)
  • Celebrating the Life of Ocracoke’s Oldest Resident, Muzel Bryant

    As many of our readers know,Muzel Bryant, Ocracoke’s oldest resident, died last month at the age of 103.  I was unable to attend her funeral,
    (0)
  • Ocracoke Island Crossword

    Welcome to Village Craftsmen’s first ever island crossword puzzle. I created this puzzle myself.  I’d never done anything like this before.  I didn’t realize that
    (0)
  • Ocracoke in 1942

    This month I provide our readers with a brief glimpse into the past with a reprint of an article published on April 11, 1942 in
    (0)
  • The Wreck of the Ariosto

    It was December of 1899.  The U.S. Life Saving Station at Cedar Hammock, just a mile or so from Hatteras Inlet, on the north end
    (0)
  • The Old Howard Cemetery

    Recently a former resident of Ocracoke asked me if I would write a newsletter about the old Howard cemetery on British Cemetery Road.  I immediately
    (0)
  • Blackbeard

    Hardly anyone who has visited Ocracoke hasn’t heard about Blackbeard, the fiercest seafarer ever to fly the black flag of piracy.  The basic story is
    (0)
  • Clamming with Morty

    by Lou Ann Homan The sky is brilliant blue with not even a trace of a cloud as I set out on my bike. The
    (0)
  • Captain Joe Burrus

    The most recognizable symbol of Ocracoke Island is the lighthouse.  This simple 75 foot tall white tower with a steady beam has been guiding mariners
    (0)
  • The “Black Squall”

    Last week the children at the Ocracoke Youth Center were having “Circus Week.”  The director, Karen Lovejoy, asked me to stop by one morning to
    (0)
  • The Ocrafolk School

    Ocracoke will host an exciting new island venture this year, the OcraFolk School.  The school  will feature a one week long session of classes and
    (0)
  • The Aleta Carries Anything

    Getting to Ocracoke in the 1940s and early 1950s was an exciting adventure.  This was before the road to Hatteras was built, and before the
    (0)
  • Replacing Ocracoke’s Seven Bridges

    North Carolina Highway 12 crosses seven tidal creeks on Ocracoke Island.  From south to north they are Island Creek (near Hammock Hills nature trail and
    (0)
  • A Traditional Island Whistle

    As in most small rural villages and towns across America, Ocracoke children of several generations ago played with a variety of homemade toys, and enjoyed
    (0)
  • Death & Dying on Ocracoke

    Ocracoke village comprises little more than 600 acres of buildable land, with about 750 residents.  In spite of the small & circumscribed land mass, and
    (0)
  • Ocracoke’s Last Fish House

    Last winter, after many years of a unique and historic maritime heritage, Ocracoke was threatened with permanent closure of the island’s last remaining fish house. 
    (0)
  • Dory Fishing Off the Beach

    By Jamie Tunnell (This article was originally published in the December, 2006 issue of the Ocracoke Observer.) Generations of watermen have haul-seined off Ocracoke for
    (0)
  • Maps of the Outer Banks

    Last month a visitor to the Ocracoke Preservation Society museum wondered aloud about the name “Portsmouth Island.”  As many of our readers know, Portsmouth lies
    (0)
  • The Community Store

    Modern-day visitors to Ocracoke Island typically imagine that the small village of several hundred homes clustered around strikingly charming Silver Lake harbor has always been
    (0)
  • Howard Street

    Ocracoke’s first residents were Native Americans, members of the Wocon tribe. Some of the earliest recorded names for the island (Wococon, Wokokon) reflect this history.
    (0)
  • Tokens of Death

    “A token of death,” an Ocracoker might exclaim, on hearing that a neighbor or family member had a disturbing dream.  Perhaps the dreamer watched another
    (0)
  • Ocracoke and the War of 1812

    A part of Ocracoke’s history little remarked on is the War of 1812.  In fact this is sometimes referred to as America’s “forgotten war.”  In
    (0)
  • Old Kade

    Ocracoke Island is a magical place with a host of interesting characters.  It has always been so. John Williams, III was born on Ocracoke in
    (0)
  • Quilting on Ocracoke

    Quilting ranks among Ocracoke Island’s traditional crafts.  In times past most island homes included a quilting frame, and Ocracoke women spent many an evening in
    (0)
  • Seafarers of Ocracoke Island

    Historic Ocracoke is most commonly referred to as a traditional fishing village.  Although this is partially true, it overlooks an important aspect of the island’s
    (0)
  • I Believe in Potlucks

    Recently eastern North Carolina’s National Public Radio station has been sponsoring a segment entitled “This I Believe.”  They regularly air a thoughtful essay written and
    (0)
  • Ocracoke Street Names, Part II

    Last month I took the opportunity to share some island history by explaining how several of Ocracoke’s street names came to be. Other names are
    (0)
  • Ocracoke Street Names, Part I

    Ocracoke Island has only had official street names for a few years; and street signs for just several months. Not so long ago folks from
    (0)
  • George & Jule

    Last week one of Ocracoke’s native sons, George Guthrie Jackson, died after a long illness.  George was descended from one of the island’s very first
    (0)
  • August Storm of 1899

    In an August journal entry Dale mentioned the Outer Banks’ “Old August Storm” of 1899, and said that I would publish more about that hurricane
    (0)
  • The Old Toothbrush Man

    Although medical care was spotty on Ocracoke in the late 19th & early 20th centuries, professional dental care was non-existent. Toothbrushes as we know them
    (0)
  • Kunigunde Guth Howard

    In a past newsletter I documented a number of island residents’ unusual first names —  names such as Epherena, Emelis, Leevella, Hiteous, and Maltby. Now
    (0)
  • Ocracoke Native Charlie Morris O’Neal

    Ocracoke native Charlie Morris O’Neal was born October 21, 1921.  He died March 27, 2005.  His family asked me to deliver the eulogy at the
    (0)
  • Winter Construction on Ocracoke

    There has been quite a bit of construction taking place on Ocracoke this winter.  Sometimes folks shudder to think about new building, but it’s not
    (0)
  • Dey Jimminy Criminy

    Michael Judge in his recent book, The Dance of Time, has this to say about February: “Although mighty Orion still commands the southern sky, Leo
    (0)
  • Lawton Howard (October 10, 1911 – March 23, 2002)

    As Lawton always liked to tell it, he was the tenth child, born at ten minutes after ten o’clock, on the tenth day of the
    (0)
  • Homer & Aliph Howard Home

    Ocracoke Island, on the Outer Banks of North Carolina, was first settled by Europeans in the mid 1700’s.  In 1759, at nearly 60 years old,
    (0)
  • Christmas on the Island

    Ocracoke Christmases in the twenty-first century are a combination of traditional and modern elements. Each season sees an increase in lighted decorations.  Some folks, especially
    (0)
  • Wreck of the Steamboat “Home” Part II

    Following is Part II of the gripping & dramatic story of a 19th century tragedy, one of the greatest sea disasters in the history of
    (0)
  • Wreck of the Steamboat “Home” Part I

    Following is the gripping & dramatic story of a 19th century tragedy, one of the greatest sea disasters in the history of the North Carolina
    (0)
  • Building an Ocracoke bird trap

    Like most small villages, towns, and neighborhoods with a sense of community, Ocracoke has many local traditions.  Island children, until recently, had their own traditions
    (0)
  • History of the Ocracoke Lighthouse

    Ocracoke’s 75′ tall white tower with a steady beacon is the island’s most prominent landmark. Built in 1823 by Noah Porter of Massachusetts for $11,359.35
    (0)
  • Legends of Blackbeard’s Skull

    Island Greetings! This month I share with you the fascinating story of the search for Blackbeard’s skull.  But first, two brief comments. Several people have
    (0)
  • Storms & Shipwrecks

    Ocracoke Island has been the final resting place for many an ill-fated vessel caught in a storm off our coast. Shipwrecks of note include the
    (0)
  • Ocracoke & Aviation, including new air service to the island

    Powered, controlled flight and the Outer Banks, especially Kitty Hawk, NC, will be forever linked in our minds. The Wright Brothers never set foot on
    (0)
  • Fat Tuesday on Ocracoke

    After a cold and stormy winter, it finally feels as if spring is just around the corner.  One sure sign of the impending warmer weather
    (0)
  • Quiet winter, and more about the Homer & Aliph Howard Home

    Winter Greetings & Happy Valentine’s Day from all of us at Village Craftsmen! Congratulations are in order for several Village Craftsmen employees: — Mary Brown,
    (0)
  • Winter Storms, Moving of the Assembly of God Church, Homer & Aliph Howard Home

    Winter Greetings from Ocracoke Island! As you might imagine, Ocracoke is quiet this time of year.  The winter holidays are behind us, most island businesses
    (0)
  • History of the Ocracoke United Methodist Church, Part II

    For a number of years tiny Ocracoke Island was home to two congregations of the Methodist Church. During the latter part of the nineteenth century
    (0)
  • Hurricane Update & History of the Ocracoke United Methodist Church, Part I

    The first record of a church on Ocracoke Island is in 1828 when the Ocracoke-Portsmouth Circuit of the Methodist Episcopal Church was established.  In October,
    (0)
  • Hurricane Isabel

    September 15, 2003 – September 23, 2003  Monday, September 15, 2003 Although no one can confidently predict the course of Hurricane Isabel at this time,
    (0)
  • Meal Wine & Drunk Pig

    Here is a traditional island recipe. Take four pounds of corn meal, five pounds of sugar, four gallons of water, three or four packages of
    (0)
  • Old names for Ocracoke Island, 1795 Map & Description

    Greetings from Wococon Island! One of the more common questions visitors to Ocracoke ask is “What is the origin of the name ‘Ocracoke?'” In spite
    (0)
  • Sigma Willis Scholarship Fund, Adopt-a-Pony Program

    July Greetings from Ocracoke! Ocracoke Island, as many of you know, is not simply a tourist resort.  It is a thriving community with a history
    (0)
  • Elnora Ballance, an Ocracoke Murder, Family Tragedy, and Major General Ira Wyche

    Visitors to Ocracoke Island are often fascinated by the many family graveyards scattered throughout the village. In fact, at least 82 small cemeteries can be
    (0)
  • Aunt Sal Stanford

    © Philip Howard, 2003 Walking through island graveyards can lead to unexpected discoveries. For instance, a quiet stroll through the old Howard cemetery on British
    (0)
  • History of Springer’s Point

    The Ghosts of Springer’s Point © Philip Howard, 2003 With 42 acres of maritime forest, Springer’s Point remains one of the last undeveloped treasures in
    (0)
  • Ocracoke Music, Island Path Summer Workshops

    Welcome to yet another Ocracoke Newsletter from Village Craftsmen.  The weather is warming up and we are looking forward to the beginning of a new
    (0)
  • Blizzard of 2003

    Today all of Eastern North Carolina, and especially the Outer Banks, experienced one of the largest snowfalls in recent history.  Not since 1980 had Ocracoke
    (0)
  • Ocracoke Holiday Traditions

    Happy Holidays to all of our friends! Ocracoke Lighthouse in a Winter Snow, 2002 As the depth of winter envelopes us we often come together
    (0)
  • Wintertime Activities, Howard Family Reunion

    Happy Thanksgiving from all of us at Village Craftsmen! Last month I reported that one of the most common questions summer visitors ask us is,
    (0)
  • Funny comments and questions

    Fall Greetings from Ocracoke Island! Perhaps it is because Ocracoke is so isolated, accessible only by boat or small plane, that throughout the summer months
    (0)
  • Tropical Storm Gustav

    Greetings! On Tuesday, September 10 tropical storm Gustav visited Ocracoke.  The winds were moderate (probably no gustier than 60 mph), but the trajectory of the
    (0)
  • Rainbow, Waterspout, & “Old Diver”

    September Greetings from Ocracoke Island! We recently received the following email from one of our island visitors, Patrick Crockett: “I thought you folks might be
    (0)
  • July 4 Parade, New Books, Old Coins

    Summer greetings from Ocracoke! As usual, the island community came together for a creative, whacky, fun-filled July 4th celebration last month.  The highlight of the
    (0)
  • Marsh Fire & Seafaring Adventures of Frank Treat Fulcher

    Welcome back to another edition of our island newsletter! Some of you may have heard about the fire scare we had last month.  A bottle
    (0)
  • Amy & David, Ocrafolk Festival 2002, Portsmouth Island, M/V Silver Lake

    Summertime greetings from Ocracoke Island! For those of you who haven’t been to the island recently, this month we share with you news about some
    (0)
  • Ocracoke Ponies and Outstanding Horsemen

    Spring greetings from Ocracoke Island! As warmer weather approaches, we are beginning to see many familiar faces returning to the island for rest and rejuvenation. 
    (0)
  • Amtrak service to Ocracoke?!?

    Welcome to another addition to our on-line Ocracoke Newsletter! This month we bring you exciting news from the island.  For all of you who worry
    (0)
  • Scalloping in Pamlico Sound

    Welcome to another edition of our on-line newsletter! Those of you who visit Ocracoke in the off-season may have noticed broken shells on Highway 12,
    (0)
  • Auction raises $3,600 & the Schooner Windfall

    Welcome to another edition of Village Craftsmen’s on-line newsletter! For those of you who missed last month’s posting you might want to see some of
    (0)
  • Winter Snow

    Islanders woke up this morning to 3-4 inches of heavy, wet snow blanketing the village.  Ocracoke hadn’t had a real snowfall for over a decade. 
    (0)
  • Ocracoke Christmas Traditions, Solstice Party

    Wintertime greetings to Friends of Ocracoke Island! We hope you are enjoying a joyous holiday season and we wish for you happiness and the best
    (0)
  • Ocracoke Thanksgiving, Brief History of Ocracoke Island

    Fall Greetings from all of us at Village Craftsmen! We hope all of you had a Thanksgiving holiday filled with many blessings.  In spite of
    (0)
  • Humorous stories about Lawton Howard, 90 year old O’cocker

    Welcome back to another edition of our on-line newsletter.  This month I share with you some amusing stories about my father, Lawton, who just celebrated
    (0)
  • Clamming & Clam Chowder recipe

    Fall Greetings from all of us at Village Craftsmen! The world and our country have changed drastically since our last newsletter was published.  The people
    (0)
  • Roy Parsons, Ocracoke & Philadelphia, “Old Drum” recipe

    September Greetings from Ocracoke Island! Many of you have had an opportunity to visit us this summer, some are planning an upcoming Fall vacation, and
    (0)
  • Fruits & vegetables from the sea, and the “Pioneer”

    This past winter as I was walking along the beach with my hat pulled down over my ears and my collar turned up against the
    (0)
  • “I’ve done promised Freener” & Island Names

    Summer is upon us and soon it will be Independence Day.  If you will be on the island July 4 be sure to check the
    (0)
  • Blue Jays, Tree Frogs, House Movings & The Island Inn

    Warm greetings from Ocracoke Island! Summer is just around the corner and, as you can see from the photos below, Ocracoke Village is bursting forth
    (0)
  • Fannie Pearl MacWilliams Wahab

    Greetings from Ocracoke Island! Ocracoke, like most isolated areas, has its share of supernatural stories.  The following was told to me by Larry Williams.  I
    (0)
  • Treasures from the sea, Community Litter Pickup, Ocracoke Fig Cake

    Spring greetings from Ocracoke Island! This afternoon as I write, Ocracoke is quiet and subdued.  Clouds and gentle rain have settled over the island and
    (0)
  • Community Store, Mail Boat, New Items, Arts Fair & OcraFolk Festival

    Hello again from Ocracoke Island! Community Gatherings: Sunday was “Customer Appreciation Day” at the Community Store.  Ricky and Gaynelle Tillett staged a big sale, free
    (0)
  • Winter Activities, Lawton Howard

    Warm greetings from the folks at Village Craftsmen! Winter is one of our favorite times on Ocracoke.  The weather may be chilly (this winter has
    (0)
  • Cormorants, Geese, Dolphins, Whales, & Christmas on Ocracoke

    Winter is a time for walking on the beach.  Sometimes it is cold and windy, but the island is quiet this season of the year,
    (0)
  • Guest Columnist, Leon

    Well hey! Leon here– For those of you who don’t know me (can’t imagine that!) I’m the very handsome black & white cat that lives
    (0)
  • Bon Appetite, Uncle Homer, Employee Lounge

    Last month I shared with you a short story about Julius Bryant and one of his floundering adventures in the mid-50’s.  Below is a more
    (0)
  • Floundering & Stories

    August is nearly gone and Labor Day is fast approaching.  Summertime on Ocracoke has been pleasant this year.  There have been many people here and
    (0)
  • Ocracoke July 4 Celebration

    Already it is nearing the end of July!  Summertime, of course, brings many people to Ocracoke for swimming, fishing, boating and just plain relaxing. In
    (0)
  • Ocrafolk Festival, Sewing & Quilts

    The first annual “Ocracoke Festival of Story and Song,” held on Saturday, June 10, was a big success!  Many outstanding musicians were featured including Ocracoke’s
    (0)
  • Ocracoke Dance, Howard Street Arts and Crafts Fair, Clay Walthall

    Welcome to our special page where we share news and information about Ocracoke Village, Ocracoke Island and Village Craftsmen. On Thursday, May 25, the Hyde
    (0)
  • Portsmouth Island, Guestbook, Photography Exhibit

    Welcome to the latest edition of our Ocracoke Newsletter. Portsmouth Island: Just across Ocracoke Inlet, to the south, lies Portsmouth Island. Path from Haulover Dock
    (0)
  • Round Creek, Down Point, and Up Trent

    Welcome to our Ocracoke Island newsletter! Howard Street Sit back, relax and let your mind take a stroll down Howard Street.  Today is a rainy,
    (0)
  • Old Quork, Molasses Creek on A Prairie Home Companion, Pottery by Elaine

    Greetings again from the folks at Village Craftsmen! Spring is definitely in the air.  It is time for repairing and painting boats, opening of shops
    (0)
  • New Fig sprouts, Muzel Bryant, Molasses Creek

    Spring is definitely on its way as evidenced by the many daffodils blooming throughout the village.  Another sign of warmer weather is the new growth
    (0)
  • Dialect, Scotch Bonnet, Joe Bell

    These past two weeks have been delightful. Saturday, Feb 26 was the perfect beach day–warm, sunny and calm.  It was so perfect I just had
    (0)
  • Rondthaler House, Ocracoke Room at Wesley Hospitality House

    This past weekend witnessed a small increase in island visitors because of the official observance of George Washington’s birthday on Monday.  To put our recent
    (0)
  • Dolphins, Ocracoke Square Dance, Dialect, Shipwreck “Nelly Potter”

    Greetings from Ocracoke Island.  It is still winter, of course, but we’ve had several days of balmy, almost Spring-like weather.  Then it turned a bit
    (0)
  • Hurricanes Dennis and Floyd, Ocracoke Dialect

    Whether you are a first-time visitor to this site or becoming a regular, welcome to our Ocracoke Island Newsletter. Many of you have asked how
    (0)
  • OcraFolk Festival, Highway 12, off-season activities

    The first annual OcraFolk Festival of story and song  will be held on June 10, 2000.  If you are planning a summer visit to the
    (0)

Newsletter Archives

2019

2018

2017

2016

2015

2014

2013

2012

2011

2010

2009

2008

2007

2006

2005

2004

2003

2002

2001

2000

Older newsletters are currently unavailable. We will be transferring them to the new site soon, so check back!